Difference between revisions of "User:SimaLazenby88"

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My name is Noreen from Amiens doing my final year engineering in Nursing. I did my schooling, secured 73% and hope to find someone with same interests in Antiquing.<br><br><br>id="cnetReview" section="rvwBody" data-component="indepthReview"> The Surface Pro has proven to be a tough act to follow. Microsoft has been the two-in-one standard bearer for the past several years, as successive generations of Surface Pro became the default idea of what a Windows tablet/laptop hybrid should be. But it's also been a hard idea to move away from, and the changes in the last few versions of the Surface Pro have been almost imperceptible, in both design and performance. <br><br>As if to remind us that this is indeed a new model, Microsoft has ditched the last couple of years of just calling this device Surface Pro and gone back to numbered versions, naming this the Surface Pro 6 (I had honestly lost count by this point). <br><br>View full gallery Sarah Tew/CNET That's a good thing, because at least from the outside, it would appear that not much else at all has changed about the Surface Pro aside from its low-key new matte black color option. The Surface Pro 6 still has a screen bezel that's on this thick side, unlike many modern laptops, tablets and hybrids that are shaving screen borders down. It still sits awkwardly on the knee (or lap), and it still includes only minimal ports, without even the increasingly popular USB-C. <br><br>Still the best little touches <br>At the same time, it also still has the best-engineered kickstand I've found in a tablet, capable of nearly (but not quite) 180 degrees of stable articulation. It still has a 3:2 aspect ratio on its 12.3-inch high-res display, which is great for reading and working on documents, thanks to more vertical headroom than the average laptop. 
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Hello from United States. I'm glad to came across you. My first name is Ariel. <br>I live in a city called Atlanta in western United States.<br>I was also born in Atlanta 37 years ago. Married in March year 2003. I'm working at the post office.<br><br><br>id="cnetReview" section="rvwBody" data-component="indepthReview"> As the long-awaited sucessor to the six-year-old D700 , the Nikon D750 delivers admirably. While its $2,300 price tag (£1,800/approximately AU$2,600) inhabits the upper reaches for many enthusiasts, it's a perfect camera for people who are picky about their photographs, who need better high-sensitivity quality than you can get with one of the less-expensive full-frame options or an APS-C-based dSLR, and who need speed for action shooting. Plus, it's a solid option for pros looking for a good value.<br><br>The camera comes in a couple of official kit configurations. The $3,000 bundle with the 24-120mm f3.5-5.6 lens is the only Nikon-approved kit in the US, but a 24-85mm f3.5-5.6 kit will also be available in the UK and possibly Australia (I couldn't find any available options with prices at the time this review was published, however).<br><br>View full gallery The D750 will be sold with the 24-120mm lens in the US, plus additional kits with the 24-85mm f3.5-5.6 lens in the UK and possibly Australia. Sarah Tew/CNET Image quality<br>Nikon really does a nice job on photo quality. The D750 has an excellent noise profile for both stills and video, and it produces significantly cleaner raw images than the Sony A99 does as ISO sensitivity increases -- unsurprising, since the latter is two years old and its image processing doesn't benefit from a couple years of fine tuning. I like the more neutral white balance of the Sony's default profile, though; Nikon's is just a hair shifted toward red/blue. And while the D810 maintains sharpness and tonal range better across the sensitivity range, for about $1,000 less the D750's photo quality stands up pretty well against the D810's.

Revision as of 02:06, 16 August 2019

Hello from United States. I'm glad to came across you. My first name is Ariel.
I live in a city called Atlanta in western United States.
I was also born in Atlanta 37 years ago. Married in March year 2003. I'm working at the post office.


id="cnetReview" section="rvwBody" data-component="indepthReview"> As the long-awaited sucessor to the six-year-old D700 , the Nikon D750 delivers admirably. While its $2,300 price tag (£1,800/approximately AU$2,600) inhabits the upper reaches for many enthusiasts, it's a perfect camera for people who are picky about their photographs, who need better high-sensitivity quality than you can get with one of the less-expensive full-frame options or an APS-C-based dSLR, and who need speed for action shooting. Plus, it's a solid option for pros looking for a good value.

The camera comes in a couple of official kit configurations. The $3,000 bundle with the 24-120mm f3.5-5.6 lens is the only Nikon-approved kit in the US, but a 24-85mm f3.5-5.6 kit will also be available in the UK and possibly Australia (I couldn't find any available options with prices at the time this review was published, however).

View full gallery The D750 will be sold with the 24-120mm lens in the US, plus additional kits with the 24-85mm f3.5-5.6 lens in the UK and possibly Australia. Sarah Tew/CNET Image quality
Nikon really does a nice job on photo quality. The D750 has an excellent noise profile for both stills and video, and it produces significantly cleaner raw images than the Sony A99 does as ISO sensitivity increases -- unsurprising, since the latter is two years old and its image processing doesn't benefit from a couple years of fine tuning. I like the more neutral white balance of the Sony's default profile, though; Nikon's is just a hair shifted toward red/blue. And while the D810 maintains sharpness and tonal range better across the sensitivity range, for about $1,000 less the D750's photo quality stands up pretty well against the D810's.